Sun. Aug 25th, 2019

A cup of Oise culture in the Northern part of Paris

15 min read

Paris is located in the wide region called Île-de-France, this one has a rich legacy and invites visitors to discover its treasures, easily reachable from the center of Paris. Here are a couple of those sites, spread in and around the fields of the Oise river, in Northern Paris, with each one its own interest and assets, worth to admire.

The Royaumont Abbey, a center for Arts and seminaries in the woods

The Royaumont Abbey is a former Cistercian monastery, still today the largest Cistercian abbey in Île-de-France, located in the hamlet of Baillon in Asnieres-sur-Oise in Val-d’Oise, about thirty kilometers north of Paris. This great Cistercian abbey of Ile-de-France, was built between 1228 and 1235 under the auspices of Louis IX, future Saint Louis, and his mother Blanche of Castille. This site met many existences and was sold as a national asset to the French Revolution.

So there are choir monks and lay monks, more connected to the rest of the population.

There was a fire that destroyed the building in 1760, including the archives, shortly before the departure of a hundred of monks in 1789.

Moreover, the Abbey was also purchased in 1791 by the Marquis de Travanet.

This entrepreneur destroyed the church for make a spinning mill and a village for the workers, changing the fate of the place.

Here’s one of the rests with a specific shape nowadays, of the late abbatial (photo credits: Alex Plato).


Following a posthumous wish of his father, Saint Louis founded this very young Royal Abbey, usually larger than a Cistercian abbey. The cross of ogives shows the Gothic contribution of the time, typical of the 12th century.

Following the bankruptcy of the successor of the marquis, there was the return of the religious devotes with the arriving of nuns of the order of the Holy Family of Bordeaux, in 1860. These stain to renovate the site, which is in perpetual renovation even today with a roof of 70,000 tiles replaced in 2016.


View of the Cloyster where the nuns left the site in 1905 to make way for the founder of SPIE-BATIGNOLLES, Jules Gouin who bought it in 1905 and whose grandson Henri created in 1964 the Royaumont Foundation, artistic promotion. Then many aspects of the site were valued like the refectory that knew many metamorphoses including an organ of 1936, date of the first musical meetings in Royaumont, a mausoleum in honor of Count Henri of Lorraine, posthumous legatee of the abbey to his son became abbot Alphonse-Louis in 1711 . It serves as a residence a dozen artists a year and a training of more than 300 artists per year. Lately, the Abbey opened to visitors or customers on seminaries, 53 rooms renovated in the former monastic cells, dedicated to a bed and breakfast format on weekends.


One of the three gardens, which acts as a botanical exhibition and medieval inspiration.
Water is ubiquitous on the site with the presence of the river and its many artificial channels.

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The #RoyaumontAbbey, a center for #Arts and seminaries in the woods The @royaumont #Abbey is a former Cistercian #Monastery, still today the largest #CistercianAbbey in #IledeFrance, located in the hamlet of Baillon in #AsnieresSurOise in #ValdOise, about 30 km north of Paris. This great #Cistercian abbey, was built between 1228 and 1235 under the auspices of Louis IX, future #SaintLouis, and his mother #BlancheOfCastille.This site met many existences and was sold as a national asset at the #FrenchRevolution. Following a posthumous wish of his father, Saint Louis founded this young #RoyalAbbey, usually larger than a Cistercian abbey. The #CrossOfOgives shows the #Gothic contribution of the time, typical of the 12th century. So there are Choir Monks and lay #monks, more connected to the rest of the population.There was a fire that destroyed the site in 1760, including the archives, shortly before the departure of a hundred of monks in 1789 and the purchase of the abbey in 1791 by the #MarquisDeTravanet, who destroyed the church for make a spinning mill and a village for the workers.Here’s one of the rests with a specific shape nowadays, of the late #abbatial. The founder of #SPIEBATIGNOLLES, Jules Gouin bought it in 1905 and whose grandson Henri created in 1964 the Royaumont Foundation, artistic promotion. Then many aspects of the site were valued like the refectory that knew many metamorphoses including an #organ of 1936, date of the first musical meetings in @les_entretiens_de_royaumont, a mausoleum in honor of Count Henri of Lorraine, posthumous legatee of the abbey to his son became #abbot Alphonse-Louis in 1711. It serves as a #artistresidence a dozen artists a year and a training of more than 300 artists. Lately, the Abbey opened to visitors or seminaries, 53 rooms renovated in the former #monasticcells, dedicated to a #bedandbreakfast format on weekends. Plus, it won the award for its design #OtisLift. Music: #JuneEvans / #IfYouWantMyLoving @iledefrance @valdoise.tourisme @oiseledepartement @oisetourisme @fraciledefrance @medef_idf @asnieres.royaumont @eglisecatho @eglisemomentum @gitesdefrance #hotelparis #minabasaran

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Auvers-Sur-Oise, on the roads to Impressionists

5.3 million euros for 8 months of works for this new exhibition space inside the Auvers-Sur-Oise Castle, including workshops of floral art and youth regular audiences, which beautifully set off the History of the Impressionism movement with new interactive contents.

Between river, undergrowth and meadows, the village of Auvers-sur-Oise becomes the home of many
painters who decide to settle there. Three “generations” of artists succeed from one to another. In 1860, Daubigny, who knows the region since his childhood, is the first to settle there. His friends Corot and Daumier decorate the walls of his house which became the first home of Auvers artists. In 1866, Pissarro moved to Pontoise, to study the natural landscapes. He proposed his friend Cezanne to join him. This one moved to Auvers in 1872, the same year as the Dr. Gachet, doctor of the Pissarro family.
This homeopathic doctor, also an artist and collector, set up an engraving workshop, attended by Daubigny, Guillaumin, Corot, then Cezanne, Pissarro and later by Van Gogh.

The OMEO project for the Château d’Auvers was born from the desire to propose a global concept for this site with multiple activities (cultural, touristic and commercial) while respecting its identity, its architectural and landscaped heritage and the technological audacity it has always shown since it opened to the public in 1994.
For two years, OMEO’s mission for the Château d’Auvers consisted of working on one hand on the cultural journey centered on a new concept of immersive visit called “Impressionist Vision, Birth and Descendancy “and on the other hand to rethink the architecture of buildings, the development of the park and gardens, as well as public places like the restaurant, the shop, the spaces events and seminars. These redevelopment works and accessibility to people with reduced mobility have been achieved in perfect consultation with the architect Daniel Passon.


The new cultural route of the castle not only offers to its visitors the opportunity to immerse themselves in the artworks of the greatest painters of the past 150 years. It also shows some of the most beautiful works from the departmental collection of Val d’Oise. A brief overview of these often overlooked masterpieces from the public, constituting the pictorial heritage of the department.

In order to establish the economic model of the Château d’Auvers in its various components and offers (cultural events, museography, scenography, catering and events) and to wear the
unique concept, at the heart of an “Impressionist Destination” contract with high added value in the territory local and international, OMEO has created spaces “in real life” that integrate with communication strategies and digital influence of the Château d’Auvers, and managed the artistic direction with the collaboration of Maya Press, press company, and Sisso, agency specializing in visual identity and content creator innovative. The know-how of these two structures, partners of OMEO, made it possible to realize the first Internet site of information dedicated to the world of impressionist painters, to produce editorial content on social networks and finally, to offer visitors an interactive and richly designed scenography documented (images, texts and sound recordings) thanks to a committee of experts from all around the world of art and culture.

  

To approach the birth of Impressionism, this first space of the course offers 300 m2 of wall surfaces with a large suspended cube in the center. The visitor is embedded in a fully immersive staging and encouraged to roam the space as the projection of images, succession of compositions of works of painters and photographs of the time, on all the walls, the floor and the cube.
The story begins before the birth of the Impressionist movement. From the 1820s, the painting, and in particular landscape painting, is undergoing profound transformations. A whole generation of painters works to free the landscape of its academic straitjacket by operating a direct return to nature, following the example of the English (such as William Turner and John Constable) and Dutch masters of the seventeenth century. With Corot and Daubigny, this new school of nature settles on the Normandy coasts and in Barbizon. The artists leave the studio to appropriate the nature outdoors. The Impressionists join in this wake and deepen the search on color and light, the visual sensation. They paint nature but also modern life.
By seeking to represent the daily in its reality and its transience, as to express the impression felt, they begin an aesthetic revolution in depth towards modern art.
This generation of avant-garde painters comes up against the strong resistance of the Académie des Beaux-Arts and will have to wait until the 1880s to know the consecration. The course presents thus a composition of academic paintings exhibited at the Salon Salon, before evoking the Salon rejects that opens on the beginnings of Impressionism. It is Napoleon III who orders the creation of the Salon des Refusés in 1863 to appease the anger of many painters rejected by the jury of the Salon Officiel. You can see the works of Pissarro and Jongkind but History will retain the scandal aroused by “The lunch on the grass” of Edouard Manet.

Another room allows visitors to grasp the richness of the Impressionist legacy. From years 1880, several artistic currents commonly grouped under the name of Post-Impressionism come into being: neo-impressionism, divisionism (or pointillism), cloisonnism, synthetism, symbolism, as well as the prefiguration of Expressionism and Fauvism. These successors of the Impressionists continue their research on light and colorful vibrations, playing a liberating role which prepares the developments of 20th century painting.


Consisting of ten video monitors that come down from the ceiling and a projection screen on the wall from the bottom, the scenography of this space encourages the strolling and places the visitor in a report new to the works. To facilitate comparison and understanding of styles and techniques, these artistic movements, which are also human and friendly adventures, are presented in pairs: Georges Seurat and Paul Signac for pointillism, then Louis Anquetin and Vincent Van Gogh, the “couple” Van Gogh and Gauguin, and the birth of Fauvism with Maurice Vlaminck and André Derain.

  

The visitor enters the painter’s studio. The decor is thought like a real space of creation, with the current canvas on the easel, the model armchair, as well as all the paraphernalia of the painter, his brushes, his palettes and its colors. Vintage color tubes are presented, including the venerable Lefranc Bourgeois house to whom we owe the development of the screw cap in 1859.

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#AuversSurOise, on the roads to #Impressionists 5.3 million euros for 8 months of works for this #newexhibition space inside the @chateau_auvers_officiel #Castle, including workshops of #floralArt and youth regular audiences, which beautifully set off the #History of the #Impressionism movement with new #InteractiveContents. From years 1880, several artistic currents commonly grouped under the name of #PostImpressionism come into being: #neoimpressionism, #divisionism (or #pointillism), #cloisonnism, #synthetism, #symbolism, as well as the prefiguration of #Expressionism and #Fauvism.  To facilitate comparison and understanding of styles and techniques, these artistic movements, are presented in pairs: #GeorgesSeurat and #PaulSignac for pointillism, then #LouisAnquetin and Vincent #VanGogh, the “couple” Van Gogh and #Gauguin, and the birth of Fauvism with Maurice #Vlaminck and André #Derain. The Château d’Auvers works on the cultural journey centered on a new concept of immersive visit called “Impressionist Vision, Birth and Descendancy" and on the other hand to rethink the architecture of buildings, the development of the park and gardens, as well as public places like the restaurant, the shop, the spaces events and seminars, in perfect consultation with the architect #DanielPasson. Music: #ValerieCarter / #WhatSBecomeOfUs @impressionismart @treasures_from_impressionism @literary_impressionism @impressionism.art @post.impressionism_ @art_impressionism @impressionism_lover @valdoise.tourisme @auverstourisme @auverscafe @wsgvar @yacht.rock @yachtrockradio #minabasaran #meghanmarkle

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The Castle of Chantilly, a vestige of opulence

The Domain of Chantilly is located in the heart of 7800 hectares of land, within one of the largest forests around Paris. Constituted since the Middle Ages by the different owners (Anne de Montmorency, the Bourbon-Conde, including the Grand Conde, cousin of Louis XIV, Henry of Orleans, Duke of Aumale), the site is a jewel of treasures combining art, nature and gastronomy.

Inside, the Musée Vivant du Cheval, its 30 horses and its team of 8 riders, offers all year long, equestrian animations as well as shows. The entire Domaine de Chantilly is owned by the Institut de France, since the donation made in 1886 by one of its members, the Duke of Aumale, thus seeking to avoid the dispersion of its rich collections. In 2005, the Institut de France signed a cooperation agreement with the Foundation for safeguarding and development of the Domain of Chantilly, created by His Highness the Aga Khan; it ensures the restoration, management and development.

Views from outside and the entrance of the city of Chantilly, where the waters from the moats mix an universe dedicated to horses and horticulture.

The park is unique because of the diversity of its gardens: the French garden designed by Le Nôtre in 17th century, the Hamlet that inspired Marie-Antoinette and saw the birth of the authenticChantilly cream, the eighteenth century Anglo-Chinese garden and the English garden of the nineteenth century. The historical labyrinth and wild birds are added to the charm of places. The Great Stables, masterful architecture of the eighteenth century, are among the most beautiful in the world.

The Castle includes the Condé Museum that consists of an exceptional collection of old paintings. More than 550 canvases are presented, and among them masterpieces of Raphael, Botticelli, Clouet, Poussin, Ingres, Delacroix, Fouquet, Watteau… On April 17, 1898, less than a year after the death of the Duke of Aumale, the Conde Museum opened its doors. The donation of his property in favor of the Institut de France established in 1886 subject to usufruct becomes effective.

The domain is now managed by the Institut de France, that keeps its museum vocation. The collections of the Condé museum are divided in several places, in the castle, in the House of Sylvie and the Jeu de Paume.

Since its opening, the organization and the presentation of the collections, thought by the Duke of Aumale, have continued, thus respecting the conditions of the donation and the memory of the prince.

Restored between 1989 and 1991 under the direction of Yves Boiret, chief architect of historical monuments, the Jeu de Paume welcomed various events.

The great hall still housed a few paintings and tapestries that evoked the museography of the Duke of Aumale.

Two examples of the decoration style of the XVIIIth century illustrated by those two rooms. On the first picture, the white and gold woodwork of the Prince’s room were executed by 1720 supervised by the architect Jean Aubert for Louis-Henri, duke of Bourbon, prince of Condé (1692-1740), Secretary of king Louis XV and builder of the Great Stables. It was the room of the prince; the furniture having disappeared in the Revolution, the duke of Aumale decorated it after 1876 with furniture of the XVIIIth century.

In the other picture, decorated between 1718 and 1720, the Grand Cabinet served as the office of the Duke of Bourbon during the XVIIIth century. From the window, the Prince could view the Grand Stables: when the doors were open it was possible to see from one end to the other. The white and gold wood panelling are typical of the early part of the XVIIIth century.

In the heart of the castle is also one of the Europe’s richest libraries: the “Cabinet des Livres”. Retaining 13,000 books including 1,500 manuscripts and 500 incunabula in this single room, the Domain possesses above all the most valuable manuscript in the world: “The Very Rich Hours of the Duke of Berry” (fifteenth century).

The Music Salon was, in the XVIIIth century, a physics cabinet and contained a number of scientific instruments.

It opened out onto the Natural History Room of the Princes of Condé, made up of three rooms dedicated to the animal, vegetable and mineral kingdoms.

Curiosity cabinets were commonplace during the Age of Enlightenment, when interest in science truly flourished.

 

 

Once again St Louis, patron saint of the royal family, is mentioned in the region because here the Chapel was constructed in 1882 by Daumet. It draws inspiration from the chapel of Ecouen, and it now holds some of this chapel’s relics: the altar that depicts “The Sacrifice of Abraham”, the wainscot in marquetry that represents “The Twelve Apostles”, and the stained glass windows. Not far from it, another Chapel in the memory of Prince Henri II of Condé, was commissioned in 1648 by the Grand Condé to sculptor Jacques Sarazin (1592-1660) for the church of Saint-Paul-Saint-Louis in Paris, to hold the heart of his father.

The Jeu de Paume, a new exhibition hall

Built between 1756 and 1758 by the architect Claude Billard of Bélisard for Louis-Joseph de Bourbon, Prince De Condé, it’s one of the latest Jeu de Paume built in France, about 42 meters long and 14 meters wide, dimensions coming from the ancient regulation of the Jeux de Paume which had to do at least 90 feet long and 27 feet wide. It is composed of two distinct entities: the “remains” at the east end of the building and the playroom.

Heir of the Domain of Chantilly in 1740, Louis-Joseph De Bourbon-Condé chooses to build a new Jeu De Paume hall in 1756. The first construction of the prince in the Domain, he decides to place it on the edge of estate, facing the Great Stables erected for his father Louis-Henri Bourbon-Condé in 1735. Spared by revolutionary destruction, the Jeu de Paume is transformed into a ballroom and then serves time to time theater, probably for the inhabitants of the nearby town of Chantilly.

The old remains are transformed into housing to accommodate in particular the guards and the architect of Louis-Henri-Joseph of Bourbon.

In 1830, on the death of Louis-Henri-Joseph duke of Bourbon, this one entrusts the field of Chantilly to his Grandnephew and godson, Henry of Orleans, Duke of Aumale, son of King Louis-Philippe d’Orléans and Marie-Amélie de Bourbon-Sicily.

The Duke of Aumale chooses to transform the large hall into an annex of his museum, installed in the Grand Château, while the spaces of the old remains are assigned to the housing of the staff of the estate.

From September 11th, 2017 to January 7th, 2018, “the Massacre of the Innocents”, masterpiece of Nicolas Poussin, will be the centerpiece of an exhibition event at the Musée Condé of the Chantilly Domain.
From its genesis to its posterity, this famous artwork will be revealed through prestigious loans and rub shoulders with big names in modern and contemporary Art including Pablo Picasso, Francis Bacon or Annette Messager. A first one for Chantilly!

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From September 11th, #2017 to January 7th, #2018, "#theMassacreoftheInnocents", #masterpiece of #NicolasPoussin, will be the #centerpiece of an #exhibition event at the #MuseeConde of the @chantillydomain. From its #genesis to its #posterity, this famous artwork will be revealed through #prestigious loans and rub shoulders with big names in modern and #contemporaryart including #PabloPicasso, #FrancisBacon or #AnnetteMessager. A first one for #Chantilly! Article link: http://francevisiting.com/index.php/2017/12/21/a-cup-of-oise-culture-in-the-northern-part-of-paris/ Music: #SheenaEaston / #TheLoverInMe #classicart @chateaudechantilly @lechateaudelatourchantilly @chantilly_bh #artexperience #artconcept #contemplation #newjack @sheena_easton #lareid #felicitetomlinson

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